What are you reading? Version 27.b

Discussion in 'Burke's Bastion' started by Intrepid, Apr 26, 2010.

  1. Man Against Time Black Hole Melchizedek

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    Another kick-ass WW2 book I've just started:

    http://www.amazon.com/Steel-Inferno-Michael-Reynolds/dp/0440225965/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1433043835&sr=8-1&keywords=Michael Reynolds Steel Inferno

    The author is a British military veteran who is shockingly objective as a historian. When you discuss the WW2 western front with many patriotarded British doofuses, they are under this strange illusion that their troops were roughly equivalent to Germany's in tactics, training, competence, morale, grit, and leadership. This book easily blows such a queer notion into 6,000,000 pieces. He's not easy on the American or Canadian armies either, but often American historians and military veterans are a little more realistic in their assessment of German capability at the time. Perhaps this is so with the Americans because they can think "well, the Germans respected General Patton at least." The typical British view can only be described as one engendered by ressentiment and fortified by fear along with feelings of inadequacy and inferiority. You'd think that I'd be talking about peckers here and--well, I suppose I cannot dismiss that possibility either, they are WASPjuden, after all.

    All cruel anti-Brit humor aside, it's a great and refreshing read. Amazon apparently has copies for as low as a penny. Grab one!

    One other significant detail I should mention about the Reynolds book. This book would be a welcome addition to the WW2 War Nerd library because of the objectivity alluded to before. Many of the Allied ground force weaknesses analyzed by him are either intentionally omitted or glossed over by the typically biased Anglo-American historian. Many of us could perhaps intuit an approximation of these weaknesses by reading in-between the lines of other works and also through outcome-determinative considerations. It's refreshing, however, to see an in-depth explanation of the differences between the composition, tactical competence, and leadership of the Allied & German ground forces with explicit and unflinching comparisons. Unusual, but welcome, and such objectivity (and I do mean objectivity - the author is not a David Irving type by any means) provides this book with a refreshing distinctiveness. You won't regret checking it out.

    His analysis does make me wonder about one thing, though: what if Patton did get 'his way,' and the Allied forces decided to 'keep going' to clash against the Soviets? Like many other patriotarded Americans I'm sure, I originally suspected that Team America could have whooped commie ass in such a scenario. The reality seems to be otherwise - unless the Allies kept the SS and Wehrmacht intact - as the Russian ground forces would have undoubtedly whooped a lot of western Yankee Judea ass. Perhaps the savvy Reptilluminati Allied leadership was correct in letting the frisky Patton perish of "natural" causes. The Brits were also smart to hesitate in disarming many of the German ground troops who surrendered to them as a security measure 'just in case' Stalin opted to 'keep going' himself.

    I suppose that while I'm at it I'll give a quick explanation for why I'm posting these. I own a pretty sizable WW2 library and haven't been able to read all of the books. This sort of thing happens when you naively obtain a membership in a Military History book club (don't do it! You'll regret it). Anyway, I've put off reading into many of them for far too long. I will not review and/or describe every one, but will instead leave that distinction for the great choices. Perhaps later I will provide honorable mentions to the other titles that aren't as l33t.
  2. Roy Fokker Forum Veteran

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    Against the Galilaeans (Ancient Greek: Κατὰ Γαλιλαίων; Latin: Contra Galileos), meaning Christians, was a Greek polemical essay written by the Roman Emperor Flavius Claudius Julianus, commonly known as Julian the Apostate, during his short reign (361–363). Despite having been originally written in Greek, it is better known under its Latin name, probably due to its extensive reference in the polemical response Contra Julianum by Cyril of Alexandria.

    As emperor, Julian had tried to stop the growing influence of Christianity in the Roman Empire, and had encouraged support for the original pagan imperial cults and ethnic religions of the Empire. In this essay Julian's described what he considered to be the mistakes and dangers of the Christian faith, and he attempted to throw an unflattering light on ongoing disputes inside the Christian Church. Julian portrayed Christians as apostates from Judaism, which the Emperor considered to be a very old and established religion that should be fully accepted. After Julian's death in battle in 363, the essay was anathematized, and even the text was lost. We only know of Julian's arguments second-hand, through texts written by Christian authors who sought to refute Julian.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Against_the_Galilaeans
  3. Angroid CyberSperg 1138

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  4. Roy Fokker Forum Veteran

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  5. Georg Schoenerer Der Judenkenner

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  6. Roy Fokker Forum Veteran

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    Messengers of Deception: UFO Contacts and Cults

    'Too many cases of "accidental" alien contact...UFO cults praying to the skies...secret "psychotronic" weapons for bending the human mind. The evidence Jacques Vallee reveals, after many years of scientific investigation, adds up to something more menacing than monsters from outer space. Messengers of Deception documents the growing effect of UFO contact claims on our lives and of the belief systems prevalent in our society. It explores the hidden realities of the cults, the contactees, the murky political intrigues and the motivations of the investigators.'

    The author, an astrophysicist, uses investigative methods to debunk the UFO phenomenon, which he seems to think are very clever but misleading hoaxes by very human perpetrators intended to be sort of a control system for shaping individual and public opinion.
  7. Man Against Time Black Hole Melchizedek

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    Memoirs of a Superfluous Man by Nock, Human Action by von Mises, The Constitution of Liberty by Hayek, and Farewell to Alms. Also reading Toynbee's Study of History here and there.
  8. Revolutionary Active Member

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  9. Medium Dave Bar Regular

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  10. billy_boatrocker Wartime Consigliere

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    Finished rereading Death on the Installment Plan and just picked up Journey to the End of the Night by L.F. Celine. He's one of my favorite authors. Hellaciously funny.

    Recent aqquisitions:
    Myth and Reality by Eliade

    Barbarous Mexico by John Kenneth Turner

    What Happens in Hamlet by John Dover Wilson - an excellent book, explains what the original meanings were and why most modern interpretations miss the mark entirely.

    Shakespeare Commentaries by Prof. Gervinius
    Found it in a bin at a Goodwill outlet store. A thick scholarly book published in 1877! Bought for $4. Saved it from the landfill or getting pulped. A fantastic find.
  11. Roy Fokker Forum Veteran

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    Sharpe's Tiger is the first historical novel in the Richard Sharpe series by Bernard Cornwell and was first published in 1997. Sharpe is a private in the British army serving in India at Seringapatam.

    Plot summary

    Richard Sharpe is a private in the 33rd Regiment of Foot in the British army, currently invading Mysore and advancing on the Tippoo Sultan's capital city of Seringapatam. Sharpe is contemplating desertion with his paramour, widow Mary Bickerstaff. His sadistic company sergeant, Obadiah Hakeswill, and company commander, Captain Morris, wish to use Mary as a prostitute and so engineer a scheme that results in Hakeswill deliberately provoking Sharpe into attacking him. The incident is witnessed by Morris and a junior officer, Ensign Hicks, resulting in Sharpe's court martial and the virtual death sentence of 2,000 lashes for the private. He is saved, however, when the regiment's commander, Arthur Wellesley, the later 1st Duke of Wellington, halts the punishment at 200 lashes. It emerges that Lieutenant William Lawford has requested Sharpe to join him in a special mission, which he agrees to with the guarantee that he will be made a sergeant if successful.

    [IMG]

    Cover of the UK Paperback edition

    Lawford and Sharpe are ordered to pose as deserters to rescue Colonel Hector McCandless, chief of the British East India Company's intelligence service, Sharpe's flogging inadvertently providing the ideal cover story for them. Although Lawford is nominally in command, Sharpe quickly dominates the lieutenant by force of personality and, without authorization, brings Mary on the mission. Furthermore, Sharpe helps establish Lawford's cover story, having the lieutenant pose as a thieving clerk who is deserting with Sharpe after witnessing the latter's punishment. They are soon captured by scouts from the Tippoo's army and led to Seringapatam where they meet Colonel Gudin, a French military adviser to the Tippoo. During their interrogation, the Tippoo enters and orders them load muskets, which takes Lawford far longer to do so than Sharpe, and then kill a British prisoner. As Sharpe prepares to execute the prisoner, who is actually Colonel McCandless, he is able to covertly tell McCandless that he is a double agent and learns that the Tippoo has set a trap for the British by mining the weakest (and thus most inviting) portion of the city walls and that they can get a message to the British via a spy in the city. Upon his attempt to shoot McCandless the musket misfires so Sharpe beats him instead before being halted by the Tippoo.

    Lawford and Sharpe are enlisted with Gudin's troops, whilst Mary is sent to work as a servant in the household of one of the Tippoo's generals, Appah Rao, who, unknown to the Tippoo, secretly supports the British since they plan to restore the Hindu Rajah if the Muslim Tippoo is defeated. Whilst Lawford is furious at Sharpe for trying to kill McCandless, Sharpe reveals what he learned from the colonel and that he knew that he would not be able to shoot McCandless since he recognized that the powder they were given was bad. His attempt to execute, and subsequent beating of, the colonel was to help prove that they were sincere deserters. As they search for the British spy, they start to earn the trust of their enemies as Lawford kills a British scout as part of a loyalty test and Sharpe helps defend a Mysore encampment which is attacked by the British. During this attack Sharpe encounters Hakeswill and tries to kill him but is stopped by Gudin who wants prisoners. Several other members of his former regiment are captured, though Morris escapes, and they are led back to Seringapatam where Hakeswill spots Lawford in the crowd. Sharpe is rewarded for his actions in the attack by the Tippoo and is allowed to visit Mary. When they reunite, however, he finds that she has left him for one of Appah Rao's men, Kunwar Singh, news which Sharpe takes in good grace. Meanwhile, the Tippoo orders the prisoners executed by his personal bodyguard, the fearsome Jettis, but Hakeswill is spared as he reveals Lawford's true rank and that, given that officers rarely desert, Sharpe and the lieutenant are spies. The two are captured and Sharpe is tortured until Lawford reveals their mission. Gudin then tells them that the spy they sought in the city had been killed weeks before and fed to the Tippoo's pet tigers. They are then imprisoned with McCandless and Hakeswill as the British army prepares to attack the city by attempting to breach the booby trapped wall. During their imprisonment, Lawford and McCandless teach Sharpe to read in order that he may be a more effective sergeant.

    After days of bombardment, the British finally breach the wall and prepare to attack. With the assault imminent, Appah Rao orders Kunwar Singh to release McCandless, so that the colonel may prevent the British looting his home, whilst the Tippoo orders Sharpe, Lawford and McCandless executed as a sacrifice. Mary joins Singh as he sets out to release McCandless and helps Sharpe escape by providing him a pistol which he uses to kill the tiger guarding them. Sharpe then swiftly defeats the Jettis sent to kill them as he, Lawford and McCandless escape, though they leave Hakeswill in the cells. Lawford and Sharpe then sabotage the mine by setting it off prematurely and capture Gudin in the process. With the early detonation of the mine, Rao decides to abandon the Tippoo and withdraws him men from the battle resulting in the fight swinging decisively towards the British. Leaving Lawford with Gudin, Sharpe returns to Hakeswill and throws him to the Tippoo's tigers, hoping they will eat the sergeant. He then hunts down the Tippoo, who was fleeing the city, and kills him before looting his corpse.

    The British take control of the city and install the Rajah as ruler, though very much as a British puppet. Hakeswill survives the encounter with the tigers since they had been fed prior to the battle and so wouldn't eat him. Sharpe, who has now been promoted to the rank of sergeant, refuses to take credit for killing the Tippoo since he would most likely be robbed of the jewels he took from the dead sultan if he admits to being the one who killed him. Despite his denial, McCandless suspects that Sharpe was the one who killed the Tippoo but does not pursue the subject, instead offering Sharpe the chance to work with him again as they watch the Tippoo's funeral.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sharpe's_Tiger
  12. Flashy Active Member

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