Saint David's Day

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  1. Apocales 4:35a.m. just one more episode..

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    Saint David's Day (Welsh: Dydd Gŵyl Dewi, Welsh pronunciation: [dɨːð ɡʊɨl ˈdɛui]) is the feast day of Saint David, the patron saint of Wales, and falls on the 1st of March each year. The first day of March was chosen in remembrance of the death of Saint David. Tradition holds that he died on that day in 569.[1] The date was declared a national day of celebration within Wales in the 18th century. Cross-party support resulted in the National Assembly for Wales voting unanimously to make Saint David's Day a public holiday in 2000. A poll conducted for Saint David's Day in 2006 found that 87% of people in Wales wanted it to be a bank holiday, with 65% prepared to sacrifice a different bank holiday to ensure this.[2] A petition in 2007 to make Saint David's Day a bank holiday was rejected by the office of the British Prime Minister Tony Blair.[3]
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  2. Bluto Drunken lout

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  3. Macrobius The Old Usager

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    http://thebookofdays.com/months/march/1.htm

    THE EMBLEM OF WALES
    Various reasons are assigned by the Welsh for wearing the leek on St. David's Day. Some affirm it to be in memory of a great victory obtained over the Saxons. It is said that, during the conflict, the Welshmen, by order of St. David, put leeks into their hats to distinguish them-selves from their enemies. To quote the Cambria of Rolt, 1759:


    'Tradition's tale Recounting tells how famed
    Menevia's priest Marshalled his Britons, and the Saxon host.
    Discomfited; how the green leek his bands
    Distinguished, since by Britons annual worn,
    Commemorates their tutelary saint.'

    In the Diverting Post, 1705, we have the following lines:


    Why, on St. David's Day, do Welshmen seek
    To beautify their hat with verdant leek
    Of nauseous smell ? For honour 'tis, hur say,
    "Duke et decorum est pro patria"
    Right, Sir, to die or fight it is, I think,
    But how is't Duke, when you for it stink?'

    Shakespeare makes the wearing of the leek to have originated at the battle of Cressy. In the play of Henry V.l Fluellin, addressing the monarch, says:


    'Your grandfather, of famous memory, an't please your Majesty, and your great uncle, Edward the Black Prince of Wales, as I have read in the chronicles, fought a most prave pattle here in France.
    'King. They did, Fluellin

    Fluellin. Your Majesty says very true; if your Majesty is remembered of it, the Welshman did goot service in a garden where leeks did grow; wearing leeks in their Monmouth caps, which your Majesty knows to this hour is an honourable padge of the service; and I do believe your Majesty takes no scorn to wear leek upon St. Tavy's Day.'


    The observance of St. David's Day was long countenanced by royalty. Even sparing Henry VII. could disburse two pounds among Welshmen on their saint's anniversary; and among the Household Expenses of the princess Mary for 1544, is an entry of a gift of fifteen shillings to the Yeomen of the King's Guard for bringing a leek to Her Grace on St. David's Day. Misson, alluding to the custom of wearing the leek, records that His Majesty William III. was complaisant enough to bear his Welsh subjects company, and two years later we find the following paragraph in The Flying Post (1699):


    'Yesterday, being St. David's Day, the King, according to custom, wore a leek in honour of the Ancient Britons, the same being presented to him by the sergeant-porter, whose place it is, and for which. he claims the clothes His Majesty wore that day; the courtiers in imitation of His Majesty wore leeks also.'


    We cannot say now as Hierome Porter said in 1632, 'that it is sufficient theme for a jealous Welshman to ground a quarrel against him that doth not honour his cap ' with the leek on St. David's Day; our modern head-dress is too ill-adapted for such verdant decorations to allow of their being worn, even if the national sentiment was as vigorous as ever; but gilt leeks are still carried in procession by the Welsh branches of Friendly Societies, and the national badge may be seen decorating the mantelpiece in Welsh houses on the anniversary of the patron saint of the principality.


    Whatever may be the conflicting opinions on the origin of wearing the leek in Wales, it is certain that this vegetable appears to have been a favourite dish with Welshmen as far back as we can trace their history. In Caxton's Description of Wales, speaking of the Manors and Bytes of the Welshmen, he says:
    'They have gruell to potage,
    And Leehes kynde to companage.'

    As also:
    'Atte meets, and after eke,
    Her solace is salt and Leeke.'

    Worlidge mentions the love of the Welsh for this alliaceous food. 'I have seen the greater part of a garden there stored with leeks, and part of the remainder with onions and garlic.' Owen in his Cambrian Biography, 1803, observes that the symbol of the leek, attributed to St. David, probably originated from the custom of Cymhortha, when the farmers, assisting each other in ploughing, brought their leeks to aid the common repast.


    Perhaps the English, if not the Welsh reader will pardon us for expressing our inclination to believe that the custom had no romantic origin whatever, but merely sprung up in allusion to the prominence of the lock in the cuisine of the Welsh people.


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  4. SouthernStar Forum Veteran

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    Thanks Mac. Very informative.

    I love leeks - in a creamy white sauce, in stew, in soup...and they aren't stinky!
  5. Apocales 4:35a.m. just one more episode..

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    bump!
  6. Johnson TRuMP

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    hails to wales

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