RIP John Wetton

Discussion in 'Jay's Lounge and Cockpit' started by il ragno, Jan 31, 2017.

  1. il ragno Proud American Deplorable

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    JOHN WETTON - GONE AT 67

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    One of the most indelible voices of progressive rock (and an unfairly-overlooked bass player as well). Wetton was always one for the bright lights, though, and he kept abandoning the prog ghetto for one grab at glory after another (Uriah Heep, Wishbone Ash, Asia, a lot of doomed 'all-star' projects and, sadly, his solo albums were just as bad if not worse.) It woulda been fab if he'd had any knack for writing good pop music, because the guy had a great singing voice and all his friends were world-class musicians; unfortunately, John Wetton went from a name that made you wanna buy the album to a name that set off alarm bells in your wallet.

    But they can never take away his shining moments, most of them early on.



    John Wetton, singer/bassist and veteran of multiple famed prog-rock outfits, died today (Jan. 31) in his sleep, with the cause of death being widely reported as colon cancer. He was 67.

    The death was confirmed on social media this morning by a number of Wetton's former bandmates, including his Asia bandmate Geoffrey Downes, who tweeted, "I am sorry to be the bearer of the very sad news that my dearest friend, bandmate and co-writer, John Wetton has passed away."

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    One of the most technically proficient and in-demand rock instrumentalists of the '70s and '80s, Wetton worked with a number of bands in his early career before coming to national prominence as the new singer and bassist for prog-rock legends King Crimson in 1972. After that group was disbanded a couple years later, Wetton spent time with the similarly renowned art-rock outfits Roxy Music and Uriah Heep, and formed the group U.K. with Crimson drummer Bill Bruford.

    In the '80s, Wetton briefly launched a solo career before joining his most commercially successful outfit: Asia, a supergroup also featuring members of Yes and Emerson, Lake & Palmer. The group's self-titled debut album was a smash, topping the Billboard 200 Albums chart for nine weeks and spawning Hot 100 top 20 hits with "Heat of the Moment" and "Only Time Will Tell." He was fired from the group after underwhelming sales for 1983's follow-up Alpha but rehired a few years later, bouncing in and out of the lineup before permanently rejoining in the late '00s.

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    Carl Palmer, who also worked with Wetton in Asia, released a statement about his late bandmate this morning, calling him a "musical giant" that was "both brave and innovative, with a voice that took the music of ASIA to the top of the charts around the world." Read the whole statement below:
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    Primo John Wetton




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  2. VisKnut Abyss

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    Butch Trucks (ABB) and now Wetton, but yet Mick Jagger won't die.
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  3. Neil Pye Forum Veteran

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  4. Giada MAGA

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    Cancer.

    RIP.
  5. il ragno Proud American Deplorable

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    Yeah, Butch Trucks. Son of a bitch! Butch killed himself in front of his old lady because it was the only way to keep the IRS from killing her, too.

    Hounded by Debt, Allman Brothers’ Butch Trucks Commits Suicide In Front of His Wife
    January 27, 2017

    Allman Brothers’ Butch Trucks committed suicide on Tuesday in front of his wife.

    Butch Trucks, drummer and co-founder of the classic rock group Allman Brothers Band, died on Tuesday. He suffered a gunshot wound to the head in his waterfront condo in West Palm Beach, Florida.

    Trucks shot himself in front of his wife of 25 years, according to the Daily Mail. Police in West Palm Beach and the group have tried to keep the suicide hidden.

    Official transcripts show a frantic call made by Trucks’ wife, Melinda, at around 6:00 p.m. Although unidentified, the transcript describes the woman as “hysterical.” Using Trucks’ real name, Claude, Melinda reportedly told the dispatcher that her “husband just shot himself” with a pistol. The dispatcher noted that she witnessed Trucks pulling the trigger.

    The transcripts describe the chaotic scene,

    “As several squad cars rolled toward the apartment building, the caller continued talking to the dispatcher although she was so distraught she couldn’t speak in complete sentences.

    Trucks suffered a gun shot wound to the head, the caller said. At that point, the caller wasn’t sure Trucks was still breathing.

    The dispatcher then radioed the officers that Trucks’ wife, painter Melinda, and a son were waiting for police in the hallway outside the condo. Trucks had two adult children, a daughter and a son, Atlanta-based musician Vaylor Trucks.”

    When police arrived, Trucks could still breathe. However, he soon “expired” seconds later. The dispatcher concluded the call, noting a “Signal 7,” the code for a dead person.

    Police refused to comment on the suicide. They put out a statement confirming that Trucks passed away in his condo. Investigators didn’t suspect foul play, but they’re still conducting an official investigation. The Palm Beach County Medical Examiner’s Office performed an autopsy Wednesday, though the results won’t be known for weeks.

    Court records show the late drummer wrestled with financial problems. In 2011, he sold his prized Palm Beach home for $2 million to pay off an $800,000 bank mortgage. Federal records show the IRS hounded Trucks. Last year, the IRS filed two liens against his $500,000 condo. Trucks had to pay additional taxes for 2013 and 2014 with a total over $540,000.


    Todd Brodginski, Trucks’ publicist, didn’t return calls made by the Daily Mail.
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  6. VisKnut Abyss

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    I was wondering why he'd shoot himself. I was headed down the terminal cancer path.
  7. il ragno Proud American Deplorable

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    Derek Trucks Remembers Butch Trucks: 'He Left an Impression at All Times'
    Guitarist on what he learned from late uncle and Allman Brothers bandmate – and what he'll miss most

    On January 24th, drummer Butch Trucks of the Allman Brothers Band committed suicide. Four days later, his nephew and Allmans bandmate, guitarist Derek Trucks, spoke to David Fricke from the road for a special tribute, in Derek's words, in Rolling Stone. That conversation ran long and deep, like a 45-minute "Mountain Jam." What follows is that extended reminiscence – in Derek's words to you.

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    It hit me in St. Louis, the first time I got onstage after finding out Butch had died. Our band has two drummers. I looked back at that position where he was with the Allman Brothers Band. Then we started playing "Statesboro Blues" – it was tough. But it was like checking in with an old friend. Butch was such a major part of that sound, as much as Gregg's voice. The way he played drums, it's not here anymore.
    My earliest memories are of traveling from Jacksonville, Florida, to visit my uncle and his family in Tallahassee. It was a massive departure from the life we were leading – this lower-middle-class background. My dad was a roofer; my mom worked in elementary school. Butch's house had these gold records and a drum set. And any time you saw Butch – when he walked in a room, when he would play – it was loud and in your face. He left an impression at all times.

    His directness and brutal honesty is what allowed the Allman Brothers to maintain that integrity for so long. He was a Duane Allman purist. What it was about then, when Duane was leading the band – that's what it should be about now, every time you hit the stage. Warren [Haynes] compared Butch to a soldier. I think that's his connection to his dad, who is still around, a World War II vet who marched under Patton: "Get it done." There's never any give.

    When the Allmans reformed in 1989, it was a resurrection of something I thought was in the past. That was the first music that was important to me – listening to At Fillmore East with my dad and seeing the way it affected him. I remember him telling me stories about going AWOL from military college in Barnesville, Georgia, to go to the Fillmore shows, because Butch pulled up: "Let's go, hop in." Those were the stories you wish you had been around for. So when the band re-formed, it was pretty damn exciting.

    It wasn't until I started playing music that I started seeing Butch a lot. I was nine or 10, playing in south Florida at this little dive bar, Tropics International. The Allmans were making that reunion record [1990's Seven Turns]. Butch brought Gregg, Warren and [bassist] Allen Woody out. That was the first time I played with Butch. I'm almost certain we played "Statesboro Blues." That was one of the first holy-shit moments for me as a musician. That sound went all the way back for me.

    Butch was a rock drummer, but the melody was always there. He was always thinking of the rise and fall, the dynamic range. He was the heart in the engine, and Jaimoe was the mystery and color. Butch was holding down the fort while Jaimoe was doing the exploring. And when they got onstage, they never had to talk about it. I don't think I ever witnessed them, in the years I was there, talk about what each other was going to play. It was a relationship that worked, and they didn't have to speak about it. It was just show up: "Oh, cool, it's my friend and brother. Let's do it." It always felt that way.

    For me, playing with Butch, in front of that rhythm section, it makes you more forceful and confident. You start realizing the possibilities and how far you can take the music. I'd heard enough at that point. I'd been around the band and even played with Butch in [his band] Frogwings. But playing with Butch in the Allman Brothers, there were gears I didn't know existed. You realize that there are new parameters – we can take this shit pretty deep.




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    The groove in "Whipping Post" and the shuffle in "Statesboro Blues" are quintessential Butch. As a kid, with any drummers that made the connection with my name, they'd be like, "Man, nobody shuffles like Butch Trucks." "In Memory of Elizabeth Reed" is another one. When the drummers play that drum fill into the groove, you're immediately in that place, with just three notes.

    The dynamics in the group changed so much in the 15 years that I was there. When I joined in 1999, Dickey [Betts] was the in-charge leader. Everybody deferred to him, whether they wanted to or not. Then after a year or so, Dickey was out. Butch had a lot of faith in me before I realized it – one, to throw me on the gig at all; then after Dickey was gone, "We got this." But the way he played is the way he lived: "Fuck it, we just charge."

    He would switch from being a bandmate to an uncle from time to time, especially in the Dickey period and then when the band was trying to figure out what it was. His idea of advice was, more than anything, advice that Duane would dole out. That was Butch's M.O. with everybody. He was always spreading the gospel of Duane. The first handful of years and the magic that created the whole thing – Butch was constantly trying to keep that alive.
    Duane was obviously a messiah figure for those guys. And when he died [in 1971], it left such a massive hole. They kept the idealist part of the music alive the whole way. But that's part of the beauty and tragedy of that band. The spirit and joy of the music was able to survive. But I don't think everything else grew at the same rate. It's a strange thing. I think about it a lot. Duane's presence was so massive for Butch. It wasn't some unspoken thing. He would bring it up.

    A lot of Butch's influence on me was just the mindset he had, that Duane instilled in him, which was, "Don't fucking get onstage and give less than what you've got. And that might not be enough either." Butch would tell me about Duane turning around to him on stage and saying, "If you give me anything less than a hundred percent, I will come back there and beat your ass." That's always been my M.O. with any band where I've been leading the charge.


    Butch was like an athlete in the sense that, as time went on, he would have to work harder to keep it up. Before the Allmans did a big run at the Beacon [in New York], he'd hire a trainer for a few weeks to get up to gig speed. And you could see it took a toll. He would be more worn down as the run would go. But he rarely felt that onstage. I can count on one hand the number of times I felt that physical thing come into play. And when it did, he would be pissed. You didn't want to be around him for a minute, because he knew it and it's not the way he operated. Often, he'd just rest up and come back loaded for bear. I'd get worn out just watching him.

    He was certainly having second thoughts after we decided to end the band [in 2014]. In theory, he was ready when we brought it up, three or four years before. But once that date started creeping up, I'm sure a lot of things hit home. If your whole being is wrapped up in this thing, how do you not do that anymore? It's hard to start a new band from scratch, get back in the van and clubs, after seeing what he has seen and knowing what he knows, having the ability to just musically spit fire: "Why am I at this place?"

    Our relationship since the split of the band – it didn't get closer. I needed to find some fresh air. But I would read interviews with him. He was as rambunctious as ever, his full Butch-blazing self right to the end. I read an article yesterday that was apparently the last interview he gave. I read it thinking maybe there was some insight into why it happened, what happened. He was talking about the band he was playing with. There was a lot of looking forward. It didn't seem like a note.

    His lasting legacy is how uncompromising he was – that sense that we can make the best music that's ever been played, by anyone, tonight. It's what we're missing in the world today – people who just show up and deliver every time. That's what he got from his dad, who's 98 and still kickin', a total badass. You have to walk all the way across France on foot? So start walkin'. And that's the way he played. There was no give in or give up ever.
    It's a miraculous thing that the Allman Brothers had, and Butch was as big a part of it as anybody. I'll never hear another shuffle and not think about his crazy ass.

    Butch Trucks, Allman Brothers band drummer, dead at 69.
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  8. Giada MAGA

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    lol...or Ozzy Osbourne.

    I saw Robby Krieger recently, he's amazing for 70 years old!
    @john z. whitey he was recently playing in your area. :)

    http://robbykrieger.com/ (The Doors)
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  9. john z. whitey Forum Veteran

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    Sorry but I don't know Robby Krieger by name anyhow but I did work with Jimmy Krieger who wrote We Just Disagree.. also worked with Tommy Nash before he joined the Dixie Chicks. All us old folks are dropping like flies except for the Jews of course. They just seem to never go away soon enough.
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  10. VisKnut Abyss

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    Actually, one of Sab's members just died. Geoff Nicholls, of post Ozzy years. So close..
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  11. il ragno Proud American Deplorable

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    Geoff Nicholls the Sabs' unheralded long-time keyboard player. (That's him on "Die Young" and the intro to "Johnny Blade", but the keyboard player on the SABBATH BLOODY SABBATH album is none other than Rick Wakeman.)

    Last year when all the melting snowflakes sobbed how much 2016 totally, like, fuckin' sucked, it was because of the death of many well-known rock stars: Bowie, Lemmy, Prince, etc.

    But when you consider that the last age that yielded up anyone who might be considered "rock stars" is already 25 years ago, and that the first great era from whence all this sprang is over 50 years old now (HARD DAY'S NIGHT was '64, DECEMBER'S CHILDREN & AFTERMATH were '65 - as were countless landmark albums of the rock era) it stands to reason that all fans have to look forward to these next few years is an avalanche of death.

    And bear this in mind: Kurt Cobain and Layne Staley and Shanon Hoon would've all turned 50 this year. Chris Cornell is 53; so's Commie Tom Morello. Trent Reznor, 52. Rollins is 55. All the hard rock and metal guys - all in their 50s now.

    There ain't been any rock stars in the 20+ years since. Basically, if you were on some records that came out before Clinton's first term, you probably have never stopped touring and you're making a living playing casinos and cruise packages, although no one's taken you seriously for decades and it's already understood that you could release a era-trascending masterpiece tomorrow, and no one is going to hear it, because no media giant is going to put any promotional elbow grease behind it no matter how good it is, and that's the only way records become hits.

    And if you started your "music career" after?.... somewhere +/- the millenium? You could build the kind of following and international recognition no new band could dream of before the age of personal computers and yet you might not even be breaking even because even your fans are robbing the albums off the Internet.

    I'm not saying there aren't a few rock stars around more relevant to this era, but nobody's ever heard of them and their deaths probably won't even be noted in 20 years time. And thaaaaat means the current music "scene" is going to be dominated for the next five or ten years by obituary notices. Well, sorry, but it's kinda what 70 & 80-year olds do.
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  12. rasputin Forum Veteran

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    I am pretty sure there's market for good music, but kikes want to push niggers and artificial shit onto whitey.
  13. pastor visser Bar Regular

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    RIP John Wetton. He made some good records.
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