Paintings You Like - Post Them Here

Discussion in 'Burke's Bastion' started by billy_boatrocker, Apr 28, 2011.

  1. billy_boatrocker Wartime Consigliere

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    Rather than booger up Sluggo's thread anymore I'll just start one for paintings I like. If you have any you like post them here. No modernist bullshit please, if you do, all your children will be born butt-naked.

    http://www.artrenewal.org/

    Caravaggio. He really had a thing about beheading people.

    "He was originally a mason's laborer, but his powerful genius directed him to painting, at which he worked with immitigable energy and amazing force. He despised every sort of idealism whether noble or emasculate, became the head of the Naturalisti (unmodified imitators of ordinary nature) in painting, and adopted a style of potent contrasts of light and shadow, laid on with a sort of fury, indicative of that fierce temper which led the artist to commit a homicide in a gambling quarrel at Rome. To avoid the consequences of his crime he fled to Naples and to Malta, where he was imprisoned for another attempt to avenge a quarrel. Escaping to Sicily, he was attacked by a party sent in pursuit of him, and severely wounded. Being pardoned, he set out for Rome; but having been arrested by mistake before his arrival, and afterwards released, and left to shift for himself in excessive heat and suffering from wounds and hardships he died of fever on the beach at Pontercole in 1609."

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    Judith Beheading Holofernes - circa 1598

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    The Sacrifice of Issac - 1602

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    David - 1607

    He did other stuff too.
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    Supper at Emmaus - 1602
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  2. billy_boatrocker Wartime Consigliere

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    Giovanni Bellini (1430-1516)

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    Saint Jerome Reading

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    Portrait of Fra Theodoro da Urbino
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  3. billy_boatrocker Wartime Consigliere

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    John William Waterhouse (1849-1917)

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    The Lady of Shalott -1888

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    Tristan and Isolde with the Potion

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    Gather Ye Rosebuds while ye may - 1908

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    A Mermaid - 1901
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  4. billy_boatrocker Wartime Consigliere

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    Lord Frederick Leighton (1830-1896)

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    The Fisherman and the Syren - 1858

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    Biondina - 1879
  5. billy_boatrocker Wartime Consigliere

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    Maxfield Parrish (1870-1966)

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    Tolornia - 1903

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    Thy Templed Hills - 1936

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    Poets Dream - 1901

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    Jack and the Beanstalk - 1923

    Well - this method is very simple, very ancient, very laborious, and by no means original with me. It is somewhat like the modern reproductions in four-color half tone, where the various gradations are obtained by printing one color plate over another on a white ground of paper. In painting it is an ancient process, and anyone can read in the many books written about the methods of the old masters, telling how each one had his own particular way of going about it: some by starting with a monochrome underpainting, some with a few colors, over which were glazed more or less transparent colors.

    "Yes, it is rather laborious, but it has some advantages over the usual ways of mixing colors together before applying them. It is generally admitted that the most beautiful qualities of a color are in its transparent state, applied over a white ground with the light shining through the color. A modern Kodachrome is a delight when held up to the light with color luminous like stained glass. So many ask what is meant by transparent color. as though it were some special make. Most all color an artist uses is transparent: only a few are opaque, such as vermillion, cerulean blue, emerald green, the ochres and most yellows, etc. Colors are applied just as they come from the tube, the original purity and quality is never lost: a purple is pure rose madder glowing through a glaze of pure blue over glaze, or vice versa, the quality of each is never vitiated by mixing them together. Mix a rose madder with white, let us say, and you get a pink, quite different from the original madder, and the result is a surface color instead of a transparent one, a color you look on instead of into. One does not paint long out of doors before it becomes apparent that a green tree has a lot of red in it. You may not see the red because your eye is blinded by the strong green, but it is there never the less. So if you mix a red with the green you get a sort of mud, each color killing the other. But by the other method. when the green is dry and a rose madder glazed over it you are apt to get what is wanted, and have a richness and glow of one color shining through the other, not to be had by mixing. Imagine a Rembrandt if his magic browns were mixed together instead of glazed. The result would be a kind of chocolate. Then too, by this method of keeping colors by themselves some can be used which are taboo in mixtures. Verdigris, for instance, is a strange cold green with considerable power, with an exceptional luminous quality, rare in greens. If in contact with coal gas it will change overnight, but when locked up in varnish it seems to last as long as any. Alizarin Orange, given up by color makers, is another. I have examples of both done forty years ago which show no signs of change.

    "I used to begin a painting with a monochrome of raw umber, for some reason: possibly read that the ancient ones often began that way. But now the start is made with a monochrome of blue, right from the tube, not mixed with white or anything. Ultramarine or the Monastral blues, or cobalt for distance and skies. This seems to make a good foundation for shadows and it does take considerable planning ahead, and looks for all the world like a blue dinner plate. The rest is a build-up of glazes until the end. The only time opaque color is used is painting trees. The method of early Corots and Rousseau is a good one, suggested by nature herself, where a tree is first painted as a dark silhouette and when dry the outside or illuminated foliage is painted over it. This opaque may be a yellow or orange as a base to glaze over with green, as the problem may demand.

    "It must be understood that when transparent glazes dry they look like nothing at all. and their glazes [color] must be brought back to life by a very thin coat of varnish. This varnish also protects one color from another should protection be called for. And it must also be understood that this varnishing is a craft all by itself and cannot be too carefully done. Hurry it, and put it on too thick and too cold, and disaster follows. Fortunately colors in their transparent state are dry when they feel dry, these glazes are extremely thin and have a chance to dry much faster than heavy impasto, whereas whites and opaque yellows seem to take forever to become thoroughly inert. Varnishing should be done in a very warm room where the painting and varnish have been exposed to the warmth for some hours. This is to drive off all invisible surface moisture and to make the varnish flow better and thinner, to be applied as thin as possible. Also, the varnished surface should remain warm until set. Days should be waited until this varnish coat is thoroughly dry: then a light rubbing of pumice flour and water takes off dust particles and makes a surface somewhat better to apply the next process.... Copal Picture Varnish is the varnish used."

    Maxfield Parrish (1950)
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  6. Jaybird Racist Son-in-Law

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    Pavel Fedotov

    Fresh Cavalier (Morning of a bureaucrat receiving his first cross)
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    Difficult Bride, 1842
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    Major's Betrothal, 1848
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  7. billy_boatrocker Wartime Consigliere

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    That's some good stuff Jay! I can see a little bit of a Diego Velasquez (a la Las Meninas) thing going on a bit in that last one.
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  8. billy_boatrocker Wartime Consigliere

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    I've always really liked this one.


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    A Bar at the Folies Bergere - Eduard Manet (1832-1883)
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  9. Jaybird Racist Son-in-Law

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    I wonder if Norman Rockwell was influenced by him.
  10. Apocales 4:35a.m. just one more episode..

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    [IMG]

    Seclusion, high in the mountains, beautiful...;)

    Swiss Baroque can be characterized by a few landmarks: the architects of the Ticino, Catholic churches, and the monasteries of Muri, Rheinau, Disentis, Einsiedeln and St.Gall. Carlo Maderno, Francesco Borromini and Domenico Fontana were important figures in seventeenth-century architectural history who did most of their work in Rome.Swiss portrait painting experienced a golden age in the eighteenth century with Jean-Etienne Liotard from Geneva and Anton Graff from Winterthur. Landscape paintings became popular in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, and numerous 'minor masters' earned their living by it. In the second half of the eighteenth century Caspar Wolf discovered the Alps as a subject, and later Alexandre Calame and Barthelemy Menn founded the well-known Geneva school for landscape paintings. Frank Buchser from Solothurn (1828-1890) painted political and military personalities in America, taking a special interest in the lives of Native and African Americans. Prominent artists include the Bernese Albert Anker (1831-1910), with his idyllic paintings of rural life, and Arnold Boecklin from Baste (1827-1910), with his mythological and fantastic paintings. Ferdinand Hodler's (1853-1918) monumental figures and mountain landscape paintings are among the most beautiful and inimitable examples of Swiss fine art. The Giacomettis, a family of artists, originated from Bergell in the canton of Graubuenden; its most famous member, the sculptor Alberto Giacometti (1901-1966), achieved international renown in Paris. Among the modern classics are Paul Klee (1879-1940) and the main representatives of the Zurich movement of 'concrete artists', Richard P. Lohse (1902-1988) and Max Bill (born 1908). Pioneers of the surrealist movement include Meret Oppenheim (1913) the sculptor Robert Mueller (born 1920), Jean Tinguely (1925-1991) and Bernhard Luginbuehl (born 1929). A few names must suffice to represent the various branches of applied art: the tapestries of Elsi Giauque are famous far beyond the borders of Switzerland, as are the ceramics of Edouard Chapallaz. Le Corbusier (1887-1965) is an outstanding figure in twentieth-century architecture, and recently the work of the Ticino architect Mario Botta has exercised a great influence.
  11. Man Against Time Black Hole Melchizedek

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    Caspar David Friedrich, "Wanderer Above the Sea of Fog" (1818).

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    Even though he did it on a mule.

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    Edward Hopper, "Nighthawks" (1942).

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    heh heh.
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  12. rust inactive

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    Paul Bril (1554–1626) View of a Port

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  13. Apocales 4:35a.m. just one more episode..

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    :agree: Great stuff on this thread.
  14. MadScienceType Trumpenkrieg

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    [IMG]

    Always liked this one for some reason. Talk about being up shit creek without a paddle, or at least a mast.
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  15. Apocales 4:35a.m. just one more episode..

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    [IMG]
  16. fips Terroriste

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    .

    PAINTED FOR THE TURKISH AMBASSADOR TO PARIS (BIG SURPRISE):

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    .
  17. Hopper New Member

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    Western art created during the period depicted has indisputable authenticity of place and time. Here are some very nice pieces.
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    Joseph Henry Sharp (1859-1953):

    http://www.legacygallery.com/public/artwork/lrg/1287164216.jpg
    Blackfoot [sic]

    http://www.parsonsart.com/SoldArt/sharpcrowcamp10x14.jpg
    Crow Camp

    http://www.parsonsart.com/SoldArt/SharpLingeringSnow.jpg
    Lingering Snow

    http://www.parsonsart.com/SoldArt/sharptaoscanyon.JPG
    Taos Canyon in October

    http://www.parsonsart.com/SoldArt/sharpaspenshondocanyon.jpg
    Aspens, Hondo Canyon

    http://www.medicinemangallery.com/bio/images/Teepee-Smoke-Part-5-4.jpg
    Medicine Teepee

    http://www.medicinemangallery.com/bio/images/Teepee-Smoke-Part-5-7.jpg
    Teepee Smoke

    http://www.medicinemangallery.com/bio/images/JosephSharp1.jpg
    Camp On the Little Big Horn [no doubt a Crow camp (they were friendly, some employed by Custer) many years after the battle.]

    http://www.moneymaker.com/gallery/slides2/wntrcmp.gif
    Winter Camp

    http://www.moneymaker.com/gallery/taos/cnclcrw.gif
    Council Call of the Crows

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    Fremont Ellis (1897-1985):

    http://www.waa-phoenix.org/resources/Ellis.jpg
    Hills of San Jose, New Mexico

    http://www.westernartandarchitecture.com/dynamic/images/event_images/thumbs/634x37516869_w_509.jpg
    Old Ranch House

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    Charles Partridge Adams (1858-1942):

    http://www.westernartandarchitecture.com/dynamic/images/event_images/thumbs/634x37516755_w_513.jpg
    Arapaho Peaks

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    Oscar E. Berninghaus (1874-1952):

    http://www.parsonsart.com/SoldArt/berninghausmoonlight.jpg
    Moonlight, Taos

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    Bert Phillips (1868-1956):

    this one is spiritually kinda strange ...
    http://www.parsonsart.com/SoldArt/phillipsmoonlightvigiltaos.jpg
    Moonlight Vigil, Taos

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    Barbara Latham (1896-1976):

    this one is very strange...

    http://www.parsonsart.com/Artists/Latham_Barbara/Media/lathammemoriesoftaos.jpg
    Memories of Old Taos II

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    The older of these artists were founders of the Taos Art Colony (1898) that eventually also hosted some famous photographers, including Ansel Adams.
    Sources same as links. Most of these are in private collections, I think.
  18. Apocales 4:35a.m. just one more episode..

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    [IMG]
  19. Apocales 4:35a.m. just one more episode..

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    [IMG]

    "All we see and seem is but a dream within a dream" - Excerpt from A Dream Within A Dream by Edgar Allan Poe.
  20. Hawthorne Abendsen Number One Epic Sloth

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