Groundbreaking Kaaba Black Stone theory

Discussion in 'The Pavilion' started by Man Against Time, Aug 26, 2016.

  1. Man Against Time Black Hole Melchizedek

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    The Black Stone venerated by Muslims at the Kaaba is the same black stone of Elagabal which was originally stored in the Elagabalium by the homo-tranny Roman Emperor Elagabalus.

    After Elagabalus was deposed and killed in AD 222, the Elagabal was sent back to Emesa (Homs) by the Romans. Arab tribes like the Banu Kalb settled around Emesa prior to the Islamic conquest of the area and it was considered an important Yamani center. Mohammed must have either purchased or grabbed a piece of it during one of his "trading" excursions in the area. He then placed it "intact" into the Kaaba in 605 A.D., yet somehow it had been there the entire time, since the days of Adam and Eve even!

    Muslims need to learn the truth about this vile stone. Apparently they have no idea that they're venerating the black stone of a pagan idol, nor do they realize that the stone is associated with and has been defiled by a pagan high priest that is probably the first transgendered figure in world history.

    @Johnson
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  2. Bluto Drunken lout

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    @Johnson
    @Fitz

    Interestink-

    [IMG]

    "Elagabalus Aureus Sol Invictus" by Classical Numismatic Group, Inc.
    http://www.cngcoins.com. Licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons

    [IMG]

    "Bronze-Uranius Antoninus-Elagabal stone-SGI 4414".
    Licensed under Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons
    The coin by Syrian ruler Uranius shows the Elagabal stone inside the Emesa temple. His identity is not completely clear to historians of 3rd century Rome.

    http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/religion/3315502/posts

    [IMG]

    "Ready- on 3, runts-"

    [IMG]

    Elagabalus' Black Rock, or a piece o' it, dat has resided in da Kaaba @ Mecca- after da Prophet acquisitioned it- has been stolen & ransomed & damaged o'er da years-

    Wikipedia

    Interestinkly enough, dere was a red stone in some worship site in Southern Araby & a white stone in da Kaaba o' al Abalat. Also-

    [IMG]

    :salowhoa:

    Wikipedia
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  3. billy_boatrocker Micro-Aggressor

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    [IMG]

    Doing what they do best, I guess. Mindless idiocy. Arabs, jews, same stupid shit. Primitive desert dweller sexual mutilation "religions" have done nothing but bring strife to the world. I say, nuke 'em all. jizzlam, judyism and anything else that happens to be in the area. Cleanse it with fire, then bring in Boers and let them build a white society.
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  4. fuz al-nufi Bar Regular

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    do u include christians in this group to be exterminated? They all come from abraham, christians, kikes, and mohammedans.

  5. billy_boatrocker Micro-Aggressor

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    Yep.

    Middle East reset button.
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  6. Roy Fokker Forum Veteran

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    Allah aka Baal aka Hubal, etc. is the 'god' of the black rock in Mecca.
  7. Man Against Time Black Hole Melchizedek

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    Purportedly, yes. But that's not the point of this little game of speculation. I will restate the line of reasoning more clearly this time and with a little less sarcasm. Obviously, when I said that Mohammed Shekelstein brought the "meteorite" stone back to Arabia himself after one of his trading or robbery expeditions to Syria during his earlier days when he was supposedly a "merchant," it was in jest. Even though the scenario is theoretically possible and even minimally plausible, I clearly don't know where the black stone came from with absolute certainty.

    In any case, first we must go back to the Roman Empire of the third century, during the chimperial Severan dynasty. Specifically we turn to the young cinaedus emperor Elagabalus, whose transvestism and passion for wearing wigs while getting cornholed drew a lot of controversy then and has apparently even led some postmodernist freaks of today to conclude that he was one of the first transgendered historical figures. In any case, Elagabalus adopted his name from the Semitic sun god, Elagabal, whose cult was located in Emesa (Homs), Syria, and who was venerated through a holy black stone said to be a conical meteorite sent from heaven. Elaclancito brought the black stone and the cult to Rome but he outraged the Praetorian Guard with his catamitism and they quickly murdered him. Out of proper respect for the deity Elagabal the Romans returned the black stone to Emesa.

    The Elagabal cult was clearly a Semite cult; first, the name of the deity is Semitic (Aramaic) and second, Elagabalus circumcised himself in order to become the new high priest of the religion. But which Semites followed this cult and revered this god? Turns out that it's an Arab cult. The Priest-Kings of the Emesani dynasty who governed the city and ran the cult were Arabs and descended from Bedouins who settled the area. The Emesani who settled the city as a whole were also tent-dwelling Arabs originally. By the 3rd century AD, Emesa became one of the most important cities in the Roman East and a highly active trading hub - it would have been a first stop for Arab or Bedouin traders. Arab tribes continued to settle around the city in pre-Islamic times and the city was an important Yamani center as the Banu Kalb had settled around the city. For this reason Emesa/Homs became the first city in Syria to have a substantial Muslim population after the conquests.

    Now, let's take a look at our Kaaba black stone. One will immediately notice several striking similarities to the Elagabala black stone. First and foremost, it is (1) (or once was) a big black stone, (2) purported to be a meteorite, (3) said to be from heaven, and (4) it was venerated by pre-Islamic Arabs, although it's not expressly clear (a) where it was venerated and (b) for whom the stone was venerated. Worse, I don't think Muslims in the Mecca establishment are reliable sources on Arab religious practices during pre-Islamic times. And we all know that Muslims will outright fabricate the supposed background history of a religious artifact, structure, or other asset if they misappropriated it from another religious group over a thousand years ago. I suppose it's also possible that they just don't know diddly squat - if the Prophet didn't write it down for them to remember, then it wasn't important.

    They would like everyone to believe that the black stone has always been there and has always been venerated there. In fact, according to them, it has been there since the time of Adam and Eve! This may be contradicted by their indication that Mohammed put the stone into the Kaaba wall in 605 A.D., but perhaps not. Still, I wonder why they insist that it has always been there ever since the dawn of frickin' time, especially when they can't substantiate that claim with any proof and when it appears that their documentary evidence of its presence there doesn't start until the 7th century A.D.?

    Of course, my contention has its own inherent burden of proof problems. It would be virtually impossible for me or anyone else to "prove" that the Kaaba black stone is the Elagabal black stone, at least in the beyond a reasonable doubt sense with direct evidence of high quality. The absolute best that can be managed is a "more probable than not" connection based on the small amount of circumstantial evidence that exists and a res ipsa loquitor type argument.

    How many big black stone meteorites could there have possibly been between the Arabian peninsula and Syria for pre-Islamic Arab pagans to venerate in those days of the later Roman Empire? If someone can show that there were at least a couple, then the theory might be rebutted. But currently I can only unearth the existence of one. My contention would also break to pieces if someone found a contemporary museum exhibit with the Elagabal stone just sitting there - and boy this would have been a waste of time.

    As I see it right now, though, the connection still looks strong. Still, I know I haven't fully connected the dots. I have not yet offered a plausible theoretical explanation for how the Elagabal black stone became the Kaaba black stone. Fortunately, I was really just saving that for last; it turns out that I do have a pretty reasonable explanation for what possibly happened:

    Emesa's black stone sun cult remained healthy and strong well into the Christian era following Constantine. Christians did not even initially try to settle into the city--they were apparently repelled by the gay ghost of Emperor Clancito. The city's first Christian bishop, Silvanus, did not even exercise jurisdiction over the city, but stuck to the villages. This shows that the Arab city natives were not in any rush to get baptized. I'm sure the Eastern Christians who were on the outside looking into Emesa were a little puzzled as to why the Arab cultists were so dedicated to this cult and resistant to the Good News. It turns out that Arabs will not waste a second even considering your god unless he can hurl down a black stone meteorite from the heavens.

    The successor to Silvanus, Bishop Antionius, finally started to settle Christians into the city. It became an important center for Eastern Christianity in the 5th century, and an ecclesiastical metropolis in 452. Knowing our Roman Empire Christians like we do, we know that they would have inevitably crushed any pagan sun worship in their new city. Sure, it's even theoretically possible that they actually did sack Elagabal's temple and even concocted some method to destroy that Satanic black stone. We know the latter didn't happen, though, because then it wouldn't have been installed in the Kaaba.

    Plus, we know how much Arabs love black stone meteorites, so there was no way in hell that the Emesari Arabs would abandon it to Christians. So these Arabs rode off with their black stone and headed to the Mecca of pagan Arab cult worship, which was ... Mecca. At roughly the same time in the 5th century, the Kaaba was established in Mecca, which somehow incorporated the hundreds of pagan gods worshiped by all of the Arab tribesmen throughout the peninsula, thereby setting itself up as the annual pilgrimage site for all of the Arabs.

    But the real magic didn't happen until the Kaaba incorporated the new black stone meteorite of Elagabala. For whatever reason, the Arabs were attracted to this black stone meteorite like moths to flame. Arab tribesmen would even run over one another just to kiss the stone--apparently, they could still smell the alluring scent left on the black stone by the feminine perfume of Emperor(-press) Elagabalus. And so it began. Before the pagan Arabs could possibly know, they were put onto the path of a conformist monotheism by a black stone once owned by a cinaedus transvestite that they would have either butchered on sight or gang-raped (since it would only be "gay" for the rapee according to Islamic norms or shariah law or whatever). And so that's it, that's the theory.

    "What's the big deal anyway? So what?" Hey, I didn't say I cracked the Da Vinci Code or anything like that. And hell, I just came up with it today through free association essentially after I learned about this black meteorite of Elagabalus. For now, it's still just a theory with an explanation that does seem to fit. Additional research can always be done to flesh it out or refine the hypothesis. Undeniably, I may be fooling myself, and there's a small chance that this could all just be a load of bullshit.

    Don't let that bother you if you just want to troll Muslims. Should that be the situation, make like it's the complete truth and keep insisting that you're only genuinely curious as to why Muslims worship a black stone that was used by deviant Roman pagans to identify the location holding the next gay orgy...

    (Still, I really do bet that the Elagabala black stone became the Kaaba black stone, meaning that we live in an insane world where a bazillion Muslims since Mohammed have gone on the hajj to venerate the most queer meteorite on Allah's green Earth.. Then again, no one ever said that Muslims were particularly smart.)

    [Last note: Many of the common knowledge facts on here were just quickly pulled from the relevant Wikipedia articles due to my apathy. Elagabala Akbar]
  8. Johnson TRuMP

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    It's entirely plausible that the black stone of the Kaaba is the black stone of Emesa. After all, nobody knows what happened to it. Impossible to prove one way or the other, but an interesting theory that may turn out to be true. You'd think if other large meteorites (or tektites) were readily available that there would have been many of these worship sites all over Arabia. The fact that there is only one black stone Kaaba, one red stone Kaaba, and one white stone Kaaba may be significant.
  9. Bluto Drunken lout

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    If Caliph Omar admits da Black Rock is jus' a rock- ain't dis worshippin' it pure idolatry?
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  10. Man Against Time Black Hole Melchizedek

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    Curiously enough, this is from Arktos (the passage is on point, as the same is discussed in J. O'Neill's Night of the Gods):

    So it's clear, then, that if the Kaaba is not the stone originally worshiped by Elagabalus, it is still at least of the same substance. And the reason for this stone's veneration is of course rooted in pagan stone worship and ancient polar mythologies. Notwithstanding that, one would still need to discover the rationale for why the Kaaba is perceived as the stone by these Arabian Semites when their own dogma cannot explain such, and perhaps that rationale can ironically enough be provided by a linkage to Elagabalus' black (likely Arab) stone.

    Apparently the old pagan stone fetish may also have something to do with the muzzies' penchant for the color green as well; this is another archetypal feature that probably can't be explained by dogma and is likely linked to their pagan roots..

    Anyway, there's definitely enough to fuel speculation that the Muslims worship the meteorite of a pagan catamite. Sooner or later anti-Islamic trolls will pick up on it, I'm sure.


    As a side note, O'Neill's Night of the Gods can be found for free on Google Books as it's from the 1890's. One cannot help thinking of the Fuhrer while reading the first chapter, as its focus is Axis worship and the swastika. It's pretty clear that Hitler was cognizant of both polar and solar archetypes, even if only subconsciously. Incidentally - happy birthday 4/20
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  11. Mandalore in recovery from sobriety

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    I see nothing even remotely surprising or improbable about your theory. Almost all Judaic/Muslim/Christian rites and artifacts are relics of the pagan era. It took at least a few generations for the first ragheads to even make a pretense at abandoning all of Allah's competition. Even now they merely call the former gods angels and djinni. The successful "monotheistic" religions are the ones who found ways to accommodate their unwashed followers' natural tendency towards bargaining for favors with creepy 2-bit deities.

    Do we have any factual studies regarding the composition of the black stone and where it actually originated? Its real damn easy to tell if it was a meteorite, and if not to know exactly where it was quarried.
  12. billy_boatrocker Micro-Aggressor

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    I suspect Mo incorporated the black stone into his "religion" because he was kinda sorta the L.Ron Hubbard of his day. He needed something for people to see. One of the main ideas was to increa$e touri$im in hi$ hometown of Mecca.
  13. Man Against Time Black Hole Melchizedek

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    I'm not sure any truly "factual" studies on the black stone have been done or have even been permitted. The Ka'aba stone is like the Shroud of Turin x 10, and the "Church" who "owns" it (not sure who that would be) would likewise be more "anti-science" than the papist Church in like proportion. Not only that, but the stone nowadays is persistently surrounded by fanatics who probably don't want it being handled by infidels.

    That being said, it seems as if some medieval Arab thinkers and philosophers have tried to look into it, and their reliability on its qualities is open to question. I presume that's where the common conclusion that it's derived from a meteorite stems from. I'm not really an expert.... Actually, before synchronistically stumbling onto the cited passage in Arktos just recently, I hadn't yet found any work juxtaposing the two clearly equivalent holy stones, which was not only surprising for surface reasons, but even more surprising after I looked into the Stone of Emesa and found that its worship was most likely Arabic and pre-Islamic in origin.

    Surprising and strange, strange as in "we probably don't want to go there" strange. While a desire to not equating the two historic stones would make sense for our contemporaries due to PC reasons, it wouldn't make sense for Enlightenment thinkers, who all would have been aware of the Stone of Emesa since practically all of 'em received a traditional classical education. Why did Gibbon, for instance, not point out the obvious? I suppose it's because the likeness can only be assumed, since no one knows what happened to the Stone of Emesa, and no one can really get their hands on the Ka'aba stone either.

    However, that logical factor has never stopped our more conspiratorially minded contemporaries before, so it's surprising that the ones of a more patriotic and anti-Islamist bent wouldn't run with it. I guess they just don't know about it yet.

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