Food Thread.

Discussion in 'The Compound' started by SouthernStar, Sep 17, 2012.

  1. Mandalore in recovery from sobriety

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    I'm totally gonna give it a try. I was thinking on mixing some garlic powder and a bit of ginger with the koji rub.
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  2. Prima Morte Saltine-American

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    Scallops in white wine with pancetta and shallots. A salad with champagne vinaigrette (Champagne vinegar, olive oil, whole grain mustard and sugar).
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  3. Fatale Man-Eating Succubus

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    My grandmother's house is surrounded by jackfruit trees. Every once in a while one of those fat yellow fuckers will fall off and explode... you can smell it from miles away, and it's a vile, rancid stench. I've never dared to taste it.
    [IMG]
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  4. Giada MAGA

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    @Fatale.

    I had never heard of jackfruit trees, nor do I think I've ever seen them, had to do a search.
    Thank you, learned something new today. :agree:

    http://uk.businessinsider.com/this-miracle-fruit-tastes-like-pulled-pork-2015-8?r=US&IR=T 'It's a miracle'


    Jackfruit is the largest tree-borne fruit in the world — one fruit can weigh between 10 and 100 pounds and contain hundreds of seeds that are rich in protein, potassium, calcium, and iron — all of which are important for bodily growth.
    ---
    Nyree Zerega is a plant biologist at the Chicago Botanic Garden who has studied the genetic diversity of jackfruit tress in Bangladesh.
    "In Bangladesh, where jackfruit is the national fruit, it is often considered the second-most important crop after mangos," Zerega told Business Insider.
    "And if you have space to grow something, you almost always have a jackfruit tree — due to both its valuable fruits and timber."
    Besides food, the jackfruit tree provides some of the following:
    • The leaves from jackfruit trees can be a source of food for goats and other farm animals.
    • The bark has an orange color, shown in the picture to the right, that was traditionally used as a dye for monk's robes.
    • The trees produce a sticky latex substance that can be used as glue.
    • Wood from the trees can be sold or used as timber.
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  5. Apocales 4:35a.m. just one more episode..

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    Why cooking counts

    [IMG]

    Study finds an increase in energy from meat, suggesting key role in evolution

    Next time you’re out to dinner, you may want to think twice before ordering your steak rare. In a first-of-its-kind study, Harvard researchers have shown that cooked meat provides more energy than raw meat, a finding that challenges the current food labeling system and suggests humans are evolutionarily adapted to take advantage of the benefits of cooking. Led by Rachel Carmody, a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Human Evolutionary Biology at Harvard’s Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, and published online ahead of print this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS Early Edition), the research bridges the fields of human evolution and modern human nutrition. “Every day, humans in every global society devote time and energy to processing food — cooking it, grinding it, slicing it, pounding it — yet we don’t understand what effect these efforts have on the energy we extract from food, or the role they might have played in our evolution,” Carmody said. “It is astonishing, since energy gain is the primary reason we eat.” Though earlier studies had examined how cooking affects specific aspects of the digestive process, surprisingly, Carmody said, none had examined whether cooking affected the overall energy value of meat. In addition, no study had compared the energetic effects of cooking with those of non-thermal processing methods like pounding, whether for meat or starch-rich foods. “There had been no research that looked at the net effects — we had pieces that we could not integrate,” Carmody said. “We knew some of the mechanisms, but we didn’t know how they combined.” To examine those effects, researchers designed a unique experiment. Over 40 days, they fed two groups of mice a series of diets that consisted of either meat or sweet potatoes prepared in four ways — raw and whole, raw and pounded, cooked and whole, and cooked and pounded. Over the course of each diet, the researchers tracked changes in the body mass of the mice, controlling for how much they ate and ran on an exercise wheel. The results, Carmody said, clearly showed that cooked meat delivered more energy to the mice than raw meat. The same was true for sweet potatoes. In both foods, the energetic gains from cooking were greater than those from pounding, and cooking increased the energy gained from pre-pounded foods. Preference tests also revealed that hungry mice strongly preferred cooked foods, suggesting that the energetic benefits of a cooked diet were obvious to the subjects themselves. It’s a finding, Carmody said, that holds exciting implications for our understanding of human evolution. Though ancestral humans were eating meat as least 2.5 million years ago, without the ability to control fire, any meat in their diet was raw, though possibly pounded using primitive stone tools. Approximately 1.9 million years ago, however, a dramatic change began to occur. The bodies of early humans grew larger.

    Their brains increased in size and complexity. Adaptations for long-distance running appeared. Earlier theories suggested these energetically costly changes were made possible by increased quantities of meat in the diet. However the results of the new research support another, albeit complementary, hypothesis — that cooking allowed humans to extract more energy from the foods they were already eating, both meat and widely available starch-rich tubers. Richard Wrangham, the Ruth Moore Professor of Biological Anthropology and master of Currier House, proposed that idea years ago, but the new study provides the first hard evidence to support it. “I’m a biologist by training,” Wrangham said. “If you want to understand the anatomical, physiological and behavioral features of a species, its diet is the first thing you ask about. If you want to know what makes a giraffe tick, it’s the fact that it eats leaves from the tops of trees. If you want to understand the shape of a flea, it’s because it eats blood. But with humans, our adaptations have in general been seen as being the result of our ability to use our brains. Because that approach focuses on problem-solving it strays from the fundamental biological concept of species being adapted to a particular type of diet, and lures us into thinking that we have no particular kind of dietary adaptation. “That’s why Rachel’s work is so important,” he continued. “For the first time, we have a clear answer to why cooking is so important cross-culturally and biologically — because it gives us increased energy. Life is all about energy.” However, the impacts of the study, which Carmody co-authored with Wrangham and Gil Weintraub, then a Harvard undergraduate and now a medical student at UCLA, aren’t limited to the early days of human evolution. The findings also lay bare some shortcomings in the Atwater system, the calorie-measurement tool used to produce modern food labels. “The system is based on principles that don’t reflect actual energy availability,” Carmody said. “First, the human gastrointestinal tract includes a whole host of bacteria, and those bacteria metabolize some of our food for their own benefit. Atwater doesn’t discriminate between food that is digested by the human versus the bacteria. Second, it doesn’t account for the energy spent digesting food, which can be substantial. In both cases, processing increases the energy accrued to the human. Such evidence suggests that food labels do not properly account for the effects of food processing.” In this way, the new research could help inform how food scientists tackle two of the thorniest of dietary challenges — the prevalence of obesity in Western nations, and malnutrition in developing parts of the world. “As human evolutionary biologists, we think about energetic gain as being something positive — it allows for growth, maintenance and reproduction, and it is therefore a critical component of a species’ evolutionary fitness,” Carmody said. “But the question in the modern world is: If we now have the problem of excess as opposed to deficit, is that still a positive? “This work illuminates that the tools we currently use to understand caloric intake, both in cases of malnutrition and cases of obesity, are suboptimal. They’ve been based on the assumption that the human body is a perfectly efficient digestion machine, when, in fact, it’s not — but we now see that its efficiency is affected by food processing, particularly cooking.”
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  6. Bluto Drunken lout

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  7. Apocales 4:35a.m. just one more episode..

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    Startup Serves Up Chicken Produced From Cells in Lab

    ‘Clean meat’ developers say it avoids towering costs of feeding, caring for livestock; Tyson Foods takes note

    A Bay Area food-technology startup says it has created the world’s first chicken strips grown from self-reproducing cells without so much as ruffling a feather. And the product pretty much tastes like chicken, according to people who were offered samples Tuesday in San Francisco, before Memphis Meats Inc.’s formal unveiling on Wednesday. Scientists, startups and animal-welfare activists believe the new product could help to revolutionize the roughly $200 billion U.S. meat industry. Their goal: Replace billions of cattle, hogs and chickens with animal meat they say can be grown more efficiently and humanely in stainless-steel bioreactor tanks. Startups including Memphis Meats and Mosa Meat, based in the Netherlands, have been pursuing the concept. They call it “clean meat,” a spin on “clean energy,” and they argue the technique would help the food industry avoid the costs of grain, water and waste-disposal associated with livestock. Scientists from those companies have already produced beef, grown from bovine cells and made into a burger and a meatball. Until now, chicken hasn’t been produced using the method. Big meat companies have taken notice. Tyson Foods Inc., the largest U.S. meat company by sales, launched a venture-capital fund in December that it says could invest in meat grown cell-by-cell. Kevin Myers, head of product development for Hormel Foods Corp., last fall called the startups’ research into the cultured-meat technology “a good long-term proposition.” On Tuesday, Memphis Meats invited a handful of taste-testers to a San Francisco kitchen and cooked and served their chicken strip, along with a piece of duck prepared à l’orange style. Some who sampled the strip—breaded, deep-fried and spongier than a whole chicken breast—said it nearly nailed the flavor of the traditional variety. Their verdict: They would eat it again. Uma Valeti, Memphis Meats’ co-founder and chief executive, said the cell-culture poultry luncheon represented a technological leap, and opened up an important market. “Chicken is the most popular protein in our country,” he said.
    [IMG]
    U.S. consumers ate an average of 90.9 pounds of chicken apiece in 2016, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. That is nearly as much as beef and pork combined. World-wide, about 61 billion chickens are raised for meat annually. The U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization has projected that chicken—relatively cheap to produce and with few religious and cultural barriers—will soar past pork as the world’s most-consumed meat by 2020. Duck is relevant for a different reason. China, which tops the list in global consumption, consumes 2.7 million metric tons of duck meat annually, nearly 10 times the next-largest consumer, France, according to data from the International Poultry Council. The average Chinese consumer eats 4.5 pounds a year. The cell-cultured meat startups are a long way from replacing the meat industry’s global network of hatcheries, chicken barns, feed mills and processing plants. But they say they’re making progress. Memphis Meats estimates its current technology can yield one pound of chicken meat for less than $9,000. That is half of what it cost the company to produce its beef meatball about a year ago.
    [IMG]
    Memphis Meats has also grown duck cell-by-cell in the lab. Photo: JASON HENRY FOR THE WALL STREET JOURNAL
    The startups, however, aspire to produce meat that can be cost-competitive with the conventionally raised kind. Boneless chicken breast costs an average $3.22 per pound in U.S. grocery stores, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Memphis Meats hopes to begin selling its meat commercially by 2021. The product already has met with skepticism from livestock groups, who remain confident that carnivores will continue to seek out farm-raised meat. But the startups have won fans among animal-welfare advocates, including those that typically oppose all meat consumption. Ingrid Newkirk, president of People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals, has said her group was “very much in favor of anything that reduces or eliminates the slaughterhouse,” and PETA helped fund some early research.
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  8. Giada MAGA

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  9. Giada MAGA

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  10. fuz al-nufi Bar Regular

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    wtf is almond milk anyways. how the fuck do u get milk out of almonds
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  11. Giada MAGA

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  12. fuz al-nufi Bar Regular

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    i drink cows and goats milk, whole. Also kefir. Because im 200% aryan.
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  13. Giada MAGA

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  14. Giada MAGA

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    I was on my phone when I originally posted.

    [IMG]
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  15. Mandalore in recovery from sobriety

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    Giada, why do you drink almond milk? I've read the packages on at least half a dozen brands and not one of them contained more than a gram or so of protein per 8 oz. I sorta understand why lotsa people ditch cow's milk, but why they drink vaguely flavored water instead is beyond me. I've asked several people IRL about this and all they can tell me is that it's "good for you".

    Kefir is 300% non-Aryan. Just another variation on the steppe nigger tradition of preserving your milk by letting it get rotten because you're too primitive to make cheese.

    I'm starting to think a few of you assholes will be living in yurts by this time next year. :jap:
  16. Giada MAGA

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  17. fuz al-nufi Bar Regular

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    should be noted aryans originated on the steppes.

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  18. Giada MAGA

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  19. Johnson TRuMP

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    ey, ya fagiol' melanzan'- get outta da way!
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  20. Georg Schoenerer Der Judenkenner

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    [IMG]

    According to a report published Thursday by the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities (CBPP), the House Republican budget plan, scheduled for a vote in early September, would slash $2.9 trillion from programs for low-income and moderate-income families over the next ten years.

    This includes a cut of $150 billion from food stamps alone, a reduction of 40 percent. According to the CBPP,
    “A funding reduction of this magnitude would end food assistance for millions of low-income families, reduce benefits for tens of millions of such families, or some combination of the two.

    “Hunger exists in nearly every community in America today. It’s an urban problem, it’s a rural problem, and it has come to our suburbs. It is also a solvable problem.”
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